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OL fireman who witnessed horrific suicide promoted

  • Written by bob

By Bob Rakow

Staff Reporter

 

February was a difficult month for Oak Lawn’s firefighters, having battled two house fires and witnessed six deaths.

 

Those firefighters were recognized for their efforts at Tuesday night’s village board meeting by receiving commendations from Fire Chief George Sheets. It was also announced that Michael Bowman was promoted to the assistant fire chief post. He was the firefighter who witnessed a horrific suicide before battling a Feb. 26 blaze.

 

John P. Conta allegedly killed his parents—John and Janice Conta—and nephew at the family home in the 9800 block of 51st Avenue. Conta then set the house on fire and killed himself with a gunshot while in the house’s garage, police said.

 

The body of Conta’s nephew, 5-year-old Matthew Meier, was discovered in the house later in the day, they said. Family members celebrated the boy’s fifth birthday at the house the previous night, police said.

Bowman was on his way to work and responded to the blaze. He entered the garage and saw John P. Conta kill himself after the gun was pointed at him, officials said.

 

“Assistant Chief Bowman jerked back thinking he might be shot,” Sheets said. “This happened in a matter of seconds.”

 

Bowman witnessed the shooting and then joined his colleagues fighting the fire—action that went above and beyond the call of duty, Sheets said

 

He said that Bowman’s ability to battle the fire after witnessing the suicide is unlike anything he’s witnessed in his 31-year career.

 

Bowman and firefighter Teddy Moran were awarded the department’s Medal of Honor for their efforts during the fire.

 

The first fire occurred in early February on the west side of the village.Kathryn Lomec, 73, was pronounced dead Feb. 8 shortly after a blaze at her house in the 10100 block of Lawrence Court, officials said. Her sister and caretaker, 74-year-old Mary Bruce, died three days later at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County.

Although Bruce ultimately died, the efforts of firefighters and paramedics allowed her to live a few more days, time that she was able to spend time surrounded by family, Sheets said.

 

 

 

 

Sheets also lauded residents who live near the 51st Avenue fire for supporting his crews during the second fire.

 

“That’s what brings a community together,” Sheets said.

 

Palermo’s Pizza fed the firefighters, who were at the scene for 12 hours in freezing temperatures. Another resident showed up with White Castle food, while others opened their homes to let emergency personnel use the bathroom and warm up.

 

“They didn’t have to do that, but they did,” Sheets said. “We were hungry. We were cold.”

 

Tuesday’s ceremony began with a moment of silence for the six people who perished as a result of the two tragedies.

 

“Your fire chief is very proud of each and every one of you,” Sheets said at the end of presentation, which also recognized firefighters from Evergreen Park and Hometown.

 

 

Checkers, anyone?

  • Written by Jeff Vorva

By Jeff Vorva

Reporter Editor

A fellow by the name of Joe Moore from Pennsylvania runs a checkers blog and he almost sounds like late comedian Rodney Dangerfield when he talks about the perception of the game he loves getting no respect.

“I believe that the single most reason checkers is underrated it because it gets compared to chess,” Moore wrote on his World of Checkers website. “Most people, especially chess players, cannot imagine checkers being taken seriously.

“Fact is, people are right in that checkers is very easy to play. What they don’t understand, however, is just how hard it is to play at a high level.’’

A fellow by the name of Mike Erickson from Evergreen Park is working at the local level to help give the game some respectability and popularity.

He is hosting the first Evergreen Park all-ages, village-wide checkers tournament from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 19 at the Hamilton B. Maher Community Center, 3450 W. 97th St. in Evergreen Park. There is a $5 entrance fee and the tournament is open to all ages. Proceeds will go to the Village Food Pantry.

“If you’re old enough, you’re never too old,’’ is the tournament’s motto.

Erickson is hoping for a big turnout. Ramon Dionisio, the Illinois State Checker Association president, will be making a guest appearance at the event.

“We want to have as many people as we can in the center,” Erickson said. “We’ll have brackets in age groups and at the end, all the champions of each age group will compete against each other for one grand champion.”

The grand champion will receive funding to play at a state competition.

Erickson is also involved in a new venture of creating and selling checkerboards with painted golf balls used as checkers. He went to a local play rehearsal and was surprised at the response.

“I took some sets with me to play practice and some of the kids are in high school I found out that some of them play checkers online with their phone,” he said. “I brought in three sets and everybody was playing during a break. The kids love it.’’

His company, Golf Ball Checkers, Etcetera, is getting off the ground and Erickson made an appearance at the Tinley Park Golf Expo in early February. He invited patrons to stop by and play and he watched as kids, adults and even some nuns had fun kinging and double jumping.

Living near golf courses helped give him an idea for the checker designs.  

 

“I live across from Beverly Country Club and I always found really good golf balls,” he said. “I would pocket those. I used to go up and down the tracks between the two courses which included the nine holes at Evergreen until they closed it. Village Hall asked me to be in an art presentation so I made a checkerboard and that was the first iteration.”

 

PAGE-1-color-3-col-golf-checkers

Photo by Jeff Vorva

Evergreen Park’s Michael Erickson is forming a checkers tournament in the village in April.

 


Telling their side of the story

  • Written by Bob Rakow

The family of Brittany Wawrzyniak plans to hold a March 29 rally to bring awareness to what they perceive as a lack of attention given to the 18-year-old Worth girl’s death investigation.

 

Wawrzyniak was found dead Nov. 8 near the Worth boat launch, and family members have been highly critical of Worth police for failing to aggressively investigate the cause.

 

“It’s so unfortunate the way police are treating this,” said Rebecca Tully, Wawrzyniak’s mother.

 

The rally is scheduled for noon at the Oak View Center, 4625 W. 110th St., Oak Lawn.

 

Tully said she plans to give a PowerPoint presentation that will include all of the information the family has gathered so far related to her daughter’s death.

 

Tully said she’ll “try to be professional” during the presentation, which she expects to be emotional.

 

“This could happen to anybody,” she said. “Four months is enough.”

 

Tully said family members and friends will begin to promote the rally next week by passing out flyers throughout the community.

 

The rally is scheduled three days before the Worth Board of Trustees April 1 meeting, which Wawrzyniak’s supporters plan to attend to demand that community leaders and police focus on the case.

 

Tully predicted that the crowd at the board meeting will be big enough to warrant a larger venue.

 

Prosecutors said Wawrzyniak was ejected from the backseat of an alleged drug dealer’s car after buying pills from him—an explanation that her family does not accept.

 

They believe Wawrzyniak set up a bogus drug buy to arrange a fight between a friend and another girl.

 

Worth police questioned Adam Wilczek and his girlfriend, Agnes Smyk, several days after the couple met with Tully at an emotional meeting also attended by several other family members.

 

Family members believe a story published in The Reporter about that meeting led police to interview Wilczek and Smyk. The Burbank couple said they shared with police the same information they provided family members at the Feb. 22 meeting.

 

“To me it seems like it was a front,” Tully said.

 

Park Clips from 2-6-14

Chicago Ridge

  Christopher Jones, 25, of Chicago, was charged with driving on a suspended, no insurance and failure to wear a seat belt Jan. 27 after a stop at 98th Street and Ridgeland Avenue, police said.
***
  Samantha B. Cornwell-Adams, 27, of Worth, was charged with driving on a suspended license, no insurance and expired registration Jan. 29 after a stop at 103rd Street and Ridgeland Avenue, police said. She also was arrested on a Cook County warrant, they said.
***
  Katrell K. Moore, 19, of Dolton, was charged with retail theft Jan. 31 after stealing goods from Spencer Gifts at Chicago Ridge Mall, police said.
***
  Mosa H. Sheikh, 20, of Bridgeview, was charged with driving on a suspended license and no insurance after a Feb. 1 stop at 103rd Street and Lyman Avenue, police said.

Hickory Hills

  Michalina T. Krauowski, 28, was charged with driving without a valid license Feb. 1 after a stop in the 7600 block of 95th Street, police said.
***
  Aaron G. Reyes, 28, of Posen, was charged with drunken driving, no insurance, driving without lights and making an improper turn Feb. 3 after a stop at Hawthorn Drive and Ash Lane, police said.

Oak Lawn

  Jewelry valued at $9,700 was reported stolen Jan. 19 from a car in the 10200 block of Cicero Avenue.
***
  Reginald Thompson, 38, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft Jan. 24 after allegedly stealing goods from Home Depot, 4060 W. 95TH St., police said.
***
  Ronnie E. Moore, 51, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft Jan. 24 after allegedly stealing merchandise from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said.
***
  Patrick J. Shea, 27, of Chicago, was charged with drunken driving, speeding, driving on a suspended license and disobeying a red light Jan. 24 after a stop at 104th Street and Tripp Avenue, police said.
***
  Maureen R. Piotrowski, 47, of Worth, was charged with disorderly conduct Jan. 31 after she was stopped in the 9600 block of Cicero Avenue, police said.
***
  A snow blower was reported stolen Jan. 31 or Feb. 1 from a shed in the 6600 block of 88th Street.
***
  A laptop was reported stolen Feb. 1 from the Oak Lawn Library, 9427 S. Raymond Ave.
***
  A Bluetooth speaker was reported stolen Feb. 1 from Walgreens, 4740 W. 95th St.
***
  Marcelino Ibarra, 61, of Chicago, was charged with retail theft Feb. 2 after allegedly stealing goods from Kmart, 4101 W. 95th St., police said.

Palos Hills

  Xavier Velazquez, 23, of Frankfort, was charged with drunken driving, improper lane use, failure to signal and following too closely Jan. 28 after a stop at 111th Street and Roberts Road, police said.
***
  A game system, games and a tablet were reported stolen Jan. 29 from an apartment in the 7900 block of 103rd Street.
***
  A laptop computer, leather coat and four Italian tinted glasses were reported stolen Feb. 1 from a house in the 10500 block of 88th Avenue.
***
  Katie Poskus, 27, of Hickory Hills, was charged with drunken driving, failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident and aggravated assault Feb. 1 after driving her car into a ditch in the 10200 block of 82nd Avenue, police said. Poskus swore at police, who noticed that she had an odor of alcohol on her breath and slurred speech. She swore at police and spat at officers when she arrived at the police station, they said.
***
  A wallet containing $500 was stolen Feb. 1 from a car in the 11100 block of Moraine Drive.

Worth

  Joshua Reilly, 20, of Worth, was charged with disorderly conduct Jan. 28 after a disturbance at an apartment in the 10900 block of Lloyd Drive, police said.
***
  Nicole M. Vass, 18, of Oak Forest, was charged with zero tolerance, driving too fast for conditions, improper lane use and no insurance Jan. 29 after a stop at 107th Street and Lloyd Avenue, police said.

Area police departments
Chicago Ridge..........425-7831
Evergreen Park........422-2142
Hickory Hills............598-4900
Oak Lawn..................499-7722
Palos Hills.................598-2272
Worth..........................448-3979

Worth officials make an Ancel-ary decision

  • Written by Bob Rakow

  Worth Village officials did some housekeeping at Tuesday’s board meeting.
  Trustees approved ordinances eliminating the village’s youth and recreational facilities commissions, committees that have not met in several years.
  “We’re cleaning up the code book,” Mayor Mary Werner said.
  The board also approved a waiver of conflict of interest that will allow its law firm, Ancel Glink, to continue to represent both the village and the Worth Park District as the park district assumes control of Worth Days.

  The village decided last year that the park district was better suited to run the fest, which this year will serve as the village’s primary 100th anniversary celebration.

  Trustee Mary Rhein voted against the measure, saying that a conflict of interest exists if Ancel Glink represents both the village and the park district.
  “I’m definitely not comfortable voting for this,” Rhein said. “It’s just too big a conflict of interest.”
  Rhein added that Werner’s husband, Steve, is president of the park board. And, she said, different municipal attorneys might examine various issues in different ways.
  Village attorney Robert Bush said the two intergovernmental agreements between the village and the park district are fairly routine and his firm would recommend another law firm if needed. He added that sticking with one law firm will save the village time and money.
  In addition to the agreement transferring control of Worth Days to the park district, the two taxing bodies plan to sign an agreement authorizing the police department to patrol village parks—a duty the department already performs but which has never be formalized, Warner said.
  Trustee Colleen McElroy said the Worth Days agreement should already have been presented to the board. The timing is important because centennial plans are already underway.

  In other business, Werner’s appointments to the centennial committee were approved. Committee members are: Gene Sikora, Linda Dawson, Bahira Karim, James Plahm, Barb Dziedzic, Robert Burns, Kari Fickes, Georgia Prendergast and Jeanne Elder. The members will serve through the end of the year. The next meeting is Feb. 3.

  The centennial kickoff celebration will be held from 7 p.m. to midnight Feb. 8 at the Chieftain Pub, 6906 W. 111th St. Admission is $10 and features food and live entertainment.