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Man tries to lure EP girl into vehicle

  A man driving an SUV attempted Friday to lure an Evergreen Park girl into his vehicle, police said.
  Police said the girl was walking in the 2700 block of 98th Street to Central Junior High School.
  The man, described as white, mid 40s, average build, bald with a black and brown mustache and wearing a black jacket, slowed his Chevrolet Suburban alongside the girl and said: “Do you want a ride? Get in.”
  The student did not reply and the man drove away south on Washtenaw Avenue, police said.
—Regional News report

Stolen car leads to burglary charges

  • Written by Bob Rakow

  A stolen car was the key to Evergreen Park police arresting four individuals involved in several recent resident burglaries in the area, police said.
  Police on Oct. 20 spotted a car at the Shell station in the 2600 block of 87th Street. The car was reported stolen 30 minutes earlier from a residence in Evergreen Park.

  Police later learned that the car’s keys were taken during a Sept. 6 residential burglary and that the driver and three passengers were involved in several burglaries in the area.
  A subsequent search of an abandoned building in the 8200 block of Kedzie Avenue in Chicago revealed several items which were taken during the burglaries, police said.
  Christopher A. Sparks, 30, and Robin M. Fields-Tiner, 23, both of Chicago, were charged with retail theft. Ryan N. Fields-Tiner, 22, of Chicago was charged with unlawful possession of a stolen vehicle, and Levert P. Wragg, 59, of Chicago, was charged with criminal trespass to motor vehicle.

  The investigation is ongoing and has revealed the offenders’ involvement in incidents in Chicago, police said.

Battering Rams

  • Written by Ken Karrson

Reavis treated roughly by inspired Bulldogs


  Evergreen Park certainly did Reavis no favor.
  By squeezing out a victory over Richards in the closing seconds of a Week 5 showdown between two unbeaten squads, the Mustangs no doubt put Bulldogs players in an ugly frame of mind. Richards coach Tony Sheehan didn’t deny it, but stated that his guys used the Evergreen “wake-up call” in a positive manner.
  “This was probably one of our best weeks of practice,” Sheehan said. “The kids were really focused. I think they realize what’s in front of them and what’s at stake, and we came ready to play Friday night.”
  Did they ever. While the visiting Rams threatened to make some early noise, the Bulldogs’ defense refused Reavis entry into the end zone. Richards’ offense, meanwhile, racked up four first-half touchdowns and eventually claimed a resounding 40-0 South Suburban Conference Red triumph at Korhonen Field.
  “I hope it will continue,” Sheehan said of his team’s solid exhibition,” and I think it will. You’ve got to play your best every week or you’re going to get beat because this conference is so balanced. We learned that last week.

Jeff Vorva's Im-PRESS-ions: Garibaldi's got talent -- and is using some of it for charity

  • Written by Jeff Vorva

Jeffs Col Impressions

Some of us are getting at that age when we see young punks run afoul of the law and say things like “why can’t they use all of that energy for something positive?’’

I’ve been saying it in recent years whenever computer geeks decide to gum up our laptops and home computers or hack into some place they shouldn’t be and do millions of dollars of damage. Why can’t they spend all of those hours doing something positive?

David Garibaldi had a little punk in him.

He admits to doing illegal activities in South Sacramento involving graffiti. He was a high school dropout and was seemingly heading nowhere with his life.

Why couldn’t this kid do something positive his talent?

Thanks to some advice from an art teacher, he turned his life around and became an amazing performance painter. He paints pictures of celebrities in less than six minutes while using music and dance in his act. He made it to the finals of “America’s Got Talent’’ in the seventh season (Judge Howie Mandel couldn’t get out of his seat fast enough to applaud Garibaldi after one performance) and has made his share of money entertaining and dazzling audiences all over the world.

His hometown media speculates he could be the next Andy Warhol.

But the cool thing about Garibaldi is that he came up with an idea.

His goal was to make $1 million before he turned 30.

All for charity.

In late 2012, at age 29, he accomplished that goal.

Garibaldi was in Oak Lawn on Jan. 19 – Martin Luther King Day – to speed paint portraits of King, Rosa Parks and Mahatma Gandhi during a presentation at the Advocate Christ Medical Center Auditorium. Those three pictures will be auctioned off at later time to help one of the hospital’s anti-violence program, so Garibaldi did not stop helping once he reached the $1 million goal.

He said some auctions have raised “tens of thousands of dollars’’ per picture.

“I realized I had this unique opportunity to use a few minutes on stage and a few hundred dollars of materials to see the value in what it brought to other people’s lives,” he told the Oak Lawn crowd. “I wanted to change the purpose behind the passion. Along the way, I was thinking ‘I don’t think we’re going to achieve this goal. That’s a very large number.’ But the night I met that goal was a reminder on why I stayed on that path.’’

Usually his act finds him painting celebrities such as Michael Jackson, Jay-Z and has done some touching pictures of Jesus.

He and a few other artists banded together and made it to the finals of “America’s Got Talent” and the group did a lot of dancing and painting to get pictures done in under two minutes.

“A lot of people overlook that I did paintings in 90 seconds,” he said after the Oak Lawn performance. “I usually do these in six minutes and that’s pretty fast. Doing this, a performance and dance in 90 seconds, was tough. It wasn’t the millions of people watching that made me nervous – it was doing something I had never done before.’’

Between the first stroke of the brushes through the final product, this guy jumps around, dances, dips his hand in the paint and throws it onto the canvas until this mess all of a sudden shapes up to be a brilliant work of art.

Sometimes he is not sure what the final product will look like until it’s over.

“Paint drips and paint doesn’t always go where you want it to,” he said. “Things change in the middle of a performance all the time. But it’s a process I’ve been doing a long time and I’m trying to perfect it. I try to capture the portrait during that moment.’’

After Oak Lawn, the next day he was performing in New Jersey and the next day he was throwing paint around in Scottsdale, Arizona.  He said he does 100 shows a year and when he’s not creating on stage, he said he practices a lot at home.

“Talent without hard work is just kind of a cool hobby,’’ he said. “I practice and try to find new ways to create.’’

SUBHEAD – 21 and counting

This was the 21st MLK celebration at Christ and one of the people overseeing all 21 events is the center’s staff chaplain, Rev. Richard E. James.

James and his committee have brought authors and entertainers – and even a play -- to the center for more than two decades including Chris Gardner, whose memoir, “The Pursuit of Happyness,”  was made into a film starring Will Smith.

J.R. Martinez, an actor and war veteran who suffered burns over 34 percent of his body and won the season 13 “Dancing with the Stars” competition, was also a guest.

Having cool guests on MLK Day is nothing new, but I asked Rev. James what he could possibly do for an encore after Garibaldi’s presentation.

“That’s a question I love to hear every year,” he said. “Our aim is to provide the creativity that Martin Luther King lived and died for. Our mission is to keep his values and philosophy alive and to put on a multi-cultural presentation that many people can enjoy. It’s not just a black thing.’’

Hickory Hills man allegedly reneges on $30,000 lewd act, gets slapped with solicitation charge

  • Written by Bob Rakow

A Hickory Hills man was charged Jan. 22 with soliciting a sexual act after refusing to pay the $30,000 he offered a man to watch him masturbate, police said.

 

Timothy J. Costello, 29, met the 20-year-old Palatine man on Facebook and offered him $30,000 to come to his apartment in the 8100 block of 87th Street and watch him perform the sexual act, according to police reports.

 

The Palatine man took a cab to the apartment and told the driver that his friend  “Tim James” would pay the $74 fare when they arrived. But Costello refused to pay when the cab arrived, police said.

 

Costello, police said, is known to have made similar offers in the past but has never made good on them. Police went to his apartment to see if he would pay the cab fare, but he did not answer the door, they said.

 

They found Costello “lurking behind the building,” the report said. Costello admitted to making the offer, but denied saying he would pay the cab fare, police said. Costello said did he not think the alleged victim would take him up on the offer, according to police.

 

The Palatine man later admitted that Costello told him to skip out on the cab fare, but he had second thoughts when he arrived at the apartment building, police said.

 

The alleged victim told police, “Man, I knew it was too good to be true.  I would have watched 10 guys masturbate for $30,000.”

 

The Palatine man telephoned his sister, who agreed to pay the cab fare via credit card. Police drove him to the station where he waited for his mother to pick him up.

 

--Bob Rakow