Menu

Vaccine may have adverse effect on young girls

  • Written by Dee Woods

Dee-Woods

In my last column, I related the early Canadian warning to readers regarding the mixture of Plavix (anti-coagulant) and Prandin (for type 2 diabetes). I wrote of how the combination could create low blood sugar and in some cases, even death. I also related that the Canadian Health Services have warned their physicians, while American doctors continue to mix the drugs.

At any rate, no sooner had I finished that article, when I came upon another warning about a common vaccine. I wrote about the problems with the vaccine over six years ago; warning parents of young girls to investigate and read up on Gardasil and to be informed and wary of the human papillomavirus drug (HPV). I wrote of the many problems, including deaths and complaints regarding the drug.       

Well, it turns out that six years later, the American College of Pediatricians is warning of even newer possible adverse events from Gardasil. It seems another possible adverse event occurring in some young women is a condition known as POF (premature ovarian failure). That means it is suspected that some young girls having had the vaccine are prematurely going through the change of life!

How awful if they ever planned on motherhood. The authors were very careful in their assessment and explained that this condition was occurring in some young girls who had the vaccine. The POF occurred from two weeks after the vaccine to a year out. They are also concerned that the POF may occur even later than one year and doctors may not associate it to the vaccine.

Dr. Scott S. Field was the major author of the warning. One of the statements made in the article after explaining the information regarding the cases of POF after the Gardasil vaccination was: “Nevertheless there are legitimate concerns that should be addressed: (1) long-term ovarian function was not assessed in either the original rat safety studies 3,4 or in the human vaccine trials; (2) most primary care physicians are probably unaware of a possible association between HPV4 and POF and may not consider reporting POF cases or prolonged amenorrhea (missing menstrual periods) to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS); (3) potential mechanisms of action have been postulated based on autoimmune associations with the aluminum adjuvant used 1 and previously documented ovarian toxicity in rats from another component, polysorbate 80,2 ; and (4) since licensure of Gardasil in 2006, there have been about 213 VAERS reports (per the publicly available CDC WONDER VAERS database) involving amenorrhea, POF or premature menopause, 88 percent of which have been associated with Gardasil. 5 The two-strain HPV2, CervarixTM, was licensed late in 2009 and accounts for 4.7 percent of VAERS amenorrhea reports since 2006, and 8.5 percent of those reports from February 2010 through May 2015. This compares to the pre-HPV vaccine period from 1990 to 2006 during which no cases of POF or premature menopause and 32 cases of amenorrhea were reported to VAERS.”

Two adjuvants of the vaccine are polysorbate 80 and aluminum. Could that pose a problem? Would you purposely ingest either?

Problems occurred as well in France. Michele Ravasi explained Gardisil is on the list of drugs under surveillance. They are concerned about side effects.

Then there’s one very brave director of the Utah Department of Health. On Feb. 11, the Salt Lake Tribune reported the director of the Utah Department of Health, Dr. David Blodgett, explained he did not like the fact that Gardasil was fast-tracked through the Food and Drug Administration and believes its benefits were oversold by Merck. He also complained the price was exceptionally high for the vaccine and suggested, “The science wasn’t good…We had physicians in our community arguing that we not make it available.”

Just remember the FDA and the drug industry has revolving doors whereby both tend to hire one another’s representatives.

Think about the problems with the rotavirus vaccine that was contaminated with a pig virus. All government agencies assured us not to worry. I mean…what’s a little pig virus to your children? Then there was Rezulin for diabetes. It was going to eliminate diabetes, but instead, it eliminated a few livers and had to be taken off the market. Oh, and let’s not forget the polio vaccine that was contaminated with SV40, the Simian virus that can cause cancer.

They are saying the evidence has not proven to be strong (but they think it’s quite a coincidence). However, more studies should be conducted. You have to decide for yourself and your children.

I would just suggest that each person getting the vaccine read the report from the College of Pediatricians first. It might open a few eyes to the risk versus benefit aspect of the vaccine.

Don’t get me wrong, we need some vaccines and we need some medications, but America is overdosed and the relationship between the makers of drugs and the FDA, can at times, cause us to wonder. Always remember…follow the money….

Dee Woods can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Evergreen Park to honor memory of fallen firefighter by renaming ice rink

  • Written by Sharon L. Filkins

 

Evergreen Park Mayor James Sexton said that an ice rink will be named in memory of a fallen firefighter who worked for the village.

Sexton also announced during the village board meeting on Monday night that the dedication service for naming the ice rink at 9000 S. Kedzie Ave. in honor of Daniel Capuano will take place at 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20 at the park.

Capuano, 42, a Chicago firefighter for 15 years who had also served Evergreen Park part-time for 16 years, was killed in the line of duty on Dec.14, 2015, leaving a wife and three children. Board members said he was known as a devoted family man and was active in coaching his sons in hockey.

The mayor also informed residents at the meeting that they are in for a great culinary experience in April when a new restaurant, The Crazey Crab, opens at 9204 S. Western Ave., Evergreen Park.

Trustees voted unanimously at the Monday board meeting to approve a business certificate for the business, owned by Mike Lester and Mike Johnson and d/b/a Chicago Famous Seafood, LLLC.

Sexton described the planned menu items as down-home, Louisiana style goodness. The owner added that the restaurant is unique in the fact that most of its menu items are boiled instead of fried.

“All of the fish and vegetables, corn, broccoli, etc., are boiled, providing a unique, healthier flavor,” said Lester.

The owners will also be applying for a beer and wine liquor license. “We won’t have a sit-down bar, but patrons will be able to order drinks,” said Lester. The facility is expected to seat about 140.

Sexton urged him to get all his paper work in and to deliver all design plans and applications himself, in order to speed up the process.

“We want to get you in business, the sooner your cash registers start ringing, the sooner we get our share,” Sexton said, laughing.

The mayor also cautioned that the owners may want to reserve more space at the location. “I think the business is going to be a huge success.” The opening is tentatively planned for mid-April.

The trustees also approved an ordinance amendment to allow for an expansion at Famous Dave’s Bar-B-Que, located at 2855 W. 95th St. The expansion will provide room for a sit-down bar in the restaurant.

Also approved was a resolution to provide village maintenance of streets and highways through Dec. 31 in the amount of $490,000. The resolution is approved annually.

In other action, approval was given to the purchase of a new ambulance at a cost of $138,933 to replace an ambulance purchased in 2001. Sexton said the purchase was a budgeted item.

Also, permission was granted to Public Works to go out for bids on the demolition of buildings located at 2942 and 2946 W. 95th St. The property will then provide additional parking for businesses in the area.

Oak Lawn approves three-year extension with Norcomm

  • Written by Dermot Connolly

The Oak Lawn Village Board has approved a three-year extension of the lease agreement with Norcomm Public Safety Communications Inc., the company hired in 2013 to staff the 911 center.

The 5-1 vote on the resolution at Tuesday’s village board meeting followed the usual pattern, with only Trustee Robert Streit (3rd) voting against the extension.

“(Outsourcing 911 services) was the worst decision we ever made. That is why I will be opposing it,” said Streit. He went on to cite incidents in which residents complained to him being kept on the line by 911 operators, repeatedly asking the same questions about location.

The 911 center, located at the village hall at 9446 S. Raymond Ave., also dispatches calls for Evergreen Park, Bridgeview and Burbank, and Streit said some of the operators argued with callers, saying the addresses they called from were not in Oak Lawn.

“You expect the 911 dispatchers to know the communities they serve, and not have to ask so many questions. It is wasting valuable time.”

However, Diana Tousignant, director of emergency communications, spoke in defense of her Norcomm staff.

“We follow a particular standard of care. We’re required to verbally verify addresses, so we will ask questions,” she said. She added that while one dispatcher is asking the follow-up questions, another is already sending help, so no time is wasted.

“We have mapping systems that show addresses,” she said.

Trustee Bud Stalker (5th) said the instances cited by Streit were “anecdotal.”

“I’ve received anecdotal evidence too. It appears that Norcomm has been doing a good job. There ae going to be mistakes in every organization but we have accurate records (showing response times),” he said.

Responding to a question from Trustee Alex Olejniczak (2nd), Tousignant said that aside from one call from Streit about an issue, no one has contacted her with complaints about service.

She said she is listed on the village website, and encouraged residents with concerns to contact her by email or phone with any questions.

Tousignant also suggested that residents look at the statistics on 911 calls that are also available on the website, under emergency communications. She pointed out that at least 90 percent of 911 calls must be answered within 10 seconds, and in 2015, more than 92 percent of calls were answered within that timeframe.

“Extending this contract was not an easy decision,” said Village Manager Larry Deetjen. He said he spoke personally with officials from Evergreen Park, Bridgeview and Burbank, and they all supported the decision.

“This company saved the village more than $1 million,” Deetjen said.

Oak Lawn approves 3-year extension with Nor

  • Written by Dermot Connolly

The Oak Lawn Village Board has approved a three-year extension of the lease agreement with Norcomm Public Safety Communications Inc., the company hired in 2013 to staff the 911 center.

The 5-1 vote on the resolution at Tuesday’s village board meeting followed the usual pattern, with only Trustee Robert Streit (3rd) voting against the extension.

“(Outsourcing 911 services) was the worst decision we ever made. That is why I will be opposing it,” said Streit. He went on to cite incidents in which residents complained to him being kept on the line by 911 operators, repeatedly asking the same questions about location.

The 911 center, located at the village hall at 9446 S. Raymond Ave., also dispatches calls for Evergreen Park, Bridgeview and Burbank, and Streit said some of the operators argued with callers, saying the addresses they called from were not in Oak Lawn.

“You expect the 911 dispatchers to know the communities they serve, and not have to ask so many questions. It is wasting valuable time.”

However, Diana Tousignant, director of emergency communications, spoke in defense of her Norcomm staff.

“We follow a particular standard of care. We’re required to verbally verify addresses, so we will ask questions,” she said. She added that while one dispatcher is asking the follow-up questions, another is already sending help, so no time is wasted.

“We have mapping systems that show addresses,” she said.

Trustee Bud Stalker (5th) said the instances cited by Streit were “anecdotal.”

“I’ve received anecdotal evidence too. It appears that Norcomm has been doing a good job. There ae going to be mistakes in every organization but we have accurate records (showing response times),” he said.

Responding to a question from Trustee Alex Olejniczak (2nd), Tousignant said that aside from one call from Streit about an issue, no one has contacted her with complaints about service.

She said she is listed on the village website, and encouraged residents with concerns to contact her by email or phone with any questions.

Tousignant also suggested that residents look at the statistics on 911 calls that are also available on the website, under emergency communications. She pointed out that at least 90 percent of 911 calls must be answered within 10 seconds, and in 2015, more than 92 percent of calls were answered within that timeframe.

“Extending this contract was not an easy decision,” said Village Manager Larry Deetjen. He said he spoke personally with officials from Evergreen Park, Bridgeview and Burbank, and they all supported the decision.

“This company saved the village more than $1 million,” Deetjen said.

Oak Lawn approves four-year contract with police union

  • Written by Dermot Connolly

               The Oak Lawn Village Board at its meeting on Tuesday approved a four-year collective bargaining agreement with the police union.

               Village Manager Larry Deetjen said the agreement with Metropolitan Alliance of Police, Oak Lawn Chapter 309 is worthy of celebration, and unanimous endorsement by the six trustees.

               The last contract ended in 2014, and Deetjen highlighted a couple of changes in the new one, which encompasses 2015-2018.

               “For the first time, any new hires to the department will have to live in Illinois, and within 50 miles of the village,” said the village manager, who said after the meeting that currently some members of both the police and fire departments live in Indiana.

               Deetjen also noted that the new contract also requires union members to beginning contributing a “slightly larger” amount of money toward their health insurance premiums. Currently, the village pays 90 percent of health insurance premiums for members of the police union, but Deetjen sad that over the life of the contract, the union members’ contribution will increase from 10 to 15 percent.

               The contract also includes a 1 percent pay raise for members retroactive for 2015, and 2.5 percent annual raises for each of the next three years.

               “This shows how things can get done with listening, cooperating and negotiating,” he said. “This was done between the village and the union, without any outside arbitrators,” he pointed out.

               While Deetjen said it deserved unanimous support from the trustees, the vote to approve it was 5-1, with Trustee Bob Streit (3rd) being the lone dissenter.

                “I, too, salute the Oak Lawn police officers and the fine work that they do…but I can’t in good conscience vote for this contract because there is a small part that would be detrimental to the village,” said Streit, pointing out that it allows police to report to work with a blood-alcohol level up to .04 percent.

               “Noting that the legal limit for driving is .08 percent, that level is often referred to as half-drunk or buzzed,” said Streit. “It’s a safety issue,” he continued. Referring to the Laquan McDonald case in Chicago, he said, “I do not want to imagine what would happen if there was a police-involved shooting, and it turned out the officer had alcohol in his or her system.”

               Streit asked that the language be reviewed and taken out of the contract, but other trustees dismissed his concerns and the vote went ahead.

               Deetjen said the point about alcohol levels was not even brought up in negotiations, and is standard in contracts that he has been involved in.

               “It has been in place for many years,” Trustee Alex Olejniczak said.

               Trustee Terry Vorderer (4th), who retired after more than 30 years on the Oak Lawn Police Department, agreed with Olejniczak’s point, “and I think (Streit) knows it too,” he said.

               Vorderer said the language is likely there because union members are subject to random tests for alcohol and drugs, and conceivably, a police officer could have had a couple of drinks the night before, and still have some alcohol remaining in the system the following day.

                However, he said that the wording of the contract also allows for action to be taken against any officer who reports to work and appears or acts like they are under the influence of alcohol. “In that case, they would be sent home, and they could face disciplinary action,” he said.