Menu

Whatizit


Whatizit

  Bella Fruendt of Hickory Hills; Cindy Fouller, Jane Foley, Dan and Laura Heneghan, and Rick and Lara Groll of Oak Lawn; Robert Solner of Worth; and Dana Oswald and Kathy Higgins of Chicago Ridge all knew last week’s “Whatizit?” was English toffee. God save the queen? That is certainly British. And her teeth? A reference to something sweet. Someone responded that “Whatizit?” was a dessert prepared by Kate Bradley during her demonstration at the Oak Lawn Public Library. A nice educated guess, and you were correct in a vague, non-committal sort of way. But no dice! You had to be specific.
  This week’s clue is: A key that doesn’t unlock doors. Send responses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. under the subject Whatizit, and include your first and last names and where you live.
 

Palos woman asks city to exempt cab driver from livery ordinance

By Kelly White
Correspondent

  A Palos Hills woman has asked the city to issue a special parking pass to a taxi driver who is a friend of her chronically ill daughter.
  Colleen Brewer, a resident of the Riviera town-home complex on Cour Versaille, pleaded to the City Council last Thursday night for a pass that would allow the man to park his taxi in the complex’s lot when he is not working. City ordinance prohibits commercial trucks and livery vehicles such as taxis and limousines from being parked overnight on city streets or in driveways and parking lots during the driver’s off-hours.
  Brewer claimed the man — who she said is one of her 34-year-old daughter’s only friends — was issued an $80 ticket at 10:15 a.m. because he parked his cab in the town-home lot while visiting. The minivan-cab is the man’s only means of transportation.
  “My daughter is physically disabled, and because of this is very limited on what she can do,” Brewer explained, noting her daughter has Chrone’s disease. “The only time she really gets out of the house is to go to and from doctors’ appointments. This is one of her only friends and preventing him from coming to visit and spend time with her, by ticketing his vehicle and as a consequence having him visit her less, will take away from her quality of life.”
  The ordinance was adopted to prevent residents from parking and storing oversized commercial vehicles in residential driveways, and was revised in 2009 to also include limousines. The City Council’s rationale at the time was that such an ordinance would keep residential areas from “looking commercial.”
  Palos Hills Mayor Jerry Bennett noted that if the man’s taxi was not parked in the town-home lot overnight, it should not have been ticketed.
  “The ordinance was put in place to pertain more to overnight hours, not daylight hours,” Bennett said.
  Brewer suggested a special-use parking pass could be issued car to her daughter’s friend to prevent from being ticketed. She also said he could park his cab in her carport instead of the common lot of Cour Versaille.
  “I do understand the ordinance, and I do agree with it,” Brewer said. “But, with this particular case concerning my daughter, I cannot help what type of vehicle her friend drives. She doesn’t get out much or get many visitors, please don’t take this away from her.”
  The council advised to talk to Palos Hills police Chief Paul Madigan about whether arranging a special-use parking pass would be possible. City officials said amending the ordinance to exempt a single person or building complex could open the city to litigation, and the council does not plan to make any changes to the law.
 

Great angst gives way to great joy


Great angst gives way to great joy

  Members of the Stagg student section were looking worried in the final half-minute of the second overtime in the Sandburg Class 4A Regional semifinal against Andrew last Thursday.
  Things got a lot better for the Chargers’ fans, above, after Kevin White hit two free throws with 13 seconds left to give the Chargers a 59-58 lead, which they held onto for the marathon win.
  For more details on the area’s postseason basketball fate, see Sports Southwest.

Fire chief wants new hire by April

By Kelly White
Correspondent

  The Chicago Ridge Fire Department is planning to add a new firefighter by April to replace one who will retire this summer.
  Chicago Ridge Fire Chief Robert Muszynski said he wants to bring the new recruit on-board before the retirement of Fire Marshall Dave Bricker. Bricker will be officially leaving the department in July, but plans to remain on staff an extra month to help with the new firefighter’s transition into the department.
  If the department does not hire a new firefighter by the time Becker leaves, it will be functioning with a staff of two fewer than for what is budgeted. The department is budgeted to operate with 19 full-time firefighter/paramedics; however, has been at 18 while an incoming recruit finishes training at the Romeoville Fire Academy.
  Muszynski has asked for the Village Board’s permission to hire another new firefighter/paramedic by April 1. The new employee will work two days a week during a two-week orientation at the Chicago Ridge Fire Station, then attend the fire academy to receive hands-on training in technical rescue awareness, hazardous materials, rope operations, investigating vehicle fires, confined space operations, improvised explosive devices awareness, trench rescue operations, response to terrorists bombings, vehicle and machinery operations, and water rescue operations. The recruit will also be CPR certified, Muszynski said.
  If the board approves the new hire to begin April 1, the firefighter’s academy training will begin April 15 and be completed by the first or second week of June, Muszynski said. If the board does not approve the April plan, the recruit would not begin academy training until Sept. 23.
  “If we don’t hire someone now, and we wait until September, without replacing the upcoming retiree prior to his retirement, there will be a period where we will only have 17 firefighters/paramedics on-staff full-time instead of 19,” he said.
 

Ridge board praises police for thwarting smash mob

By Kevin M. Coyne
Correspondent

  The Chicago Ridge Village Board on Tuesday commended the village’s police chief for taking control of the operation that may have prevented a group of teens from wreaking havoc last weekend at the Chicago Ridge Mall.
  Nearly 300 teens comprising the same group of youths that damaged property and looted stores last month at Ford City Mall in Chicago planned to do the same thing last Saturday at the Chicago Ridge Mall, Pyznarski told the board at its weekly meeting. Police officers from several other towns and Cook County guarded the Chicago Ridge mall from 1 to 7 p.m. to protect against what Pyznarski called a “smash mob.”
  “Because of our police presence we were told that the kids were posting on various social media that the Chicago Ridge Mall had a heavy police presence and to cancel their plan,” said Chief Pyznarski. “We owe a lot to the other departments that came together to help us out.”
  Chicago Ridge police were tipped off to the teens’ plan by the Chicago Police Department’s gang unit. Tips were also flowing in from Chicago public school teachers after the mob’s plans to attack the mall surfaced on Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets, Pyznarski said.
  “We took action as soon as we were told that there were plans to attack the Chicago Ridge Mall,” the chief added. “We didn’t want to get caught off-guard. We had it to where we got ahold of Pace Bus so that we could know how many kids were on the bus.

  Pyznarski stationed roughly 25 officers inside the mall and 25 Chicago Ridge officers outside the building, while Oak Lawn police covered 94th street one block north.

  “If a group of four kids were talking around we would break up the group,” said Pyznarski. “I told the kids as they got off the bus, ‘if you guys want to go shopping, you’re more than welcome, but if there are any issues you’re getting arrested.’”
  For more on this story, see Page 2.