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Shepard brightens holidays for 40 needy families

  • Written by Bob McParland

  After final exams, students andSCHIOOL-PAGE-3-col-SHEPARDShepard High School teacher Erin McLean checks her list as student and staff volunteers organize donated gifts and food for the Adopt-a-Family project. Submitted photo. teachers at Shepard High School did not race to the parking lot to leave for winter break. Instead, they went to work.

  With the school’s Multipurpose Room brimming with food, clothing, and gifts, volunteers made final preparations for Adopt-A-Family.
  The next day, when more than 40 families would pick up the donations, they would have little time to organize: Last-minute contributions would arrive, and sometimes a desperate parent would call to plea for help.
  Today they needed to lay out the room with the gifts and food for each family at every table. When families arrived to pick up, volunteers would just need to direct them to the right table.
  Teacher Erin McLean walked the room checking her list and answering every question from student and staff volunteers. Teachers Brad Fisher, Gina Hanna, and Courtney Siska helped direct traffic as donations arrived and staff members and students asked what goes where.
  McLean kept the master list, matching the donations to each family’s needs.
  This year, Jewel Food Store in Palos Heights donated 20 turkeys to help complete the boxes of food. In addition to wrapped gifts for children, families received holiday meals with either a ham or turkey.

Bulletin Board from 1-2-14

Brother Rice
  Brother Rice will host its eighth grade entrance exam on at 8 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 11.
  Test-takers should bring their $25 test fee and two No. 2 pencils with them the morning of the test Checks made payable to Brother Rice High School. Pre-registration is not necessary. Calculators are not allowed for the entrance exam. Any student requiring accommodations should contact Admissions Director Tim O’Connell at 773-429-4312 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
  All parents are welcome to join their sons for a welcome to Brother Rice on the morning of the exam. A quick presentation in the gym will follow, detailing the admissions process and next steps towards joining the Crusader family. Donuts and juice will be provided.

Moraine Valley
Spring registration
  Moraine Valley Community College can help students realize their educational goals, pursue an associate’s degree and prepare for a successful future. Registration is underway for the spring 2014 semester, which starts Jan. 13 with on-campus credit classes. Off-campus credit classes and on-campus continuing education classes begin Jan. 21, and off-campus continuing education classes begin Jan. 27.
  Some of the college’s courses are offered in different formats to accommodate the needs of students, making it easy for people to fit college classes into their life. These Flexible Learning Options include:
  • Online and Internet Hybrid classes
  • Short-Term Classes
  • Weekend Classes
  • Off-Campus Classes
  • Evening Classes
  • One-Day-a-Week Classes
  A complete list of credit and noncredit classes can be found in the spring 2014 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $109 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, located on campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired 974-9556); or online at morainevalley.edu.

Moraine Valley
Tinley Park campus spring courses
  Looking for a shorter commute for classes at Moraine Valley Community College?
  The college will offer 60 classes, beginning Jan. 21, at its Southwest Education Center (SWEC), 17900 S. 94th Ave. in Tinley Park.
  Some credit classes include Keyboarding I, Art Appreciation, Introduction to Business, Composition I and II, Introduction to Criminal Justice, American History I, Medical Terminology, College Algebra, Music Appreciation, Introduction to Psychology, General Sociology, and Spanish. There are also several noncredit classes offered at SWEC including Plus 50 Internet Basics, Medicare Workshop, Hiring Employees, Food for Life, “Reel” Classic Films, and Beginning Conversational Spanish.
  A complete listing of all the classes at SWEC and credit and noncredit classes offered at all Moraine Valley campuses can be found in the spring 2014 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $109 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, on the main campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired 974-9556); or online at morainevalley.edu.

Bulletin Board from 12-19-13

Brother Rice
  Brother Rice will host its eighth grade entrance exam on at 8 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 11.
  Test-takers should bring their $25 test fee and two No. 2 pencils with them the morning of the test Checks made payable to Brother Rice High School. Pre-registration is not necessary. Calculators are not allowed for the entrance exam. Any student requiring accommodations should contact Admissions Director Tim O’Connell at 773-429-4312 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
  All parents are welcome to join their sons for a welcome to Brother Rice on the morning of the exam. A quick presentation in the gym will follow, detailing the admissions process and next steps towards joining the Crusader family. Donuts and juice will be provided.

Moraine Valley Spring registration
  Moraine Valley Community College can help students realize their educational goals, pursue an associate’s degree and prepare for a successful future. Registration is underway for the spring 2014 semester, which starts Jan. 13 with on-campus credit classes. Off-campus credit classes and on-campus continuing education classes begin Jan. 21, and off-campus continuing education classes begin Jan. 27.
  Some of the college’s courses are offered in different formats to accommodate the needs of students, making it easy for people to fit college classes into their life. These Flexible Learning Options include:
  • Online and Internet Hybrid classes
  • Short-Term Classes
  • Weekend Classes
  • Off-Campus Classes
  • Evening Classes
  • One-Day-a-Week Classes
  A complete list of credit and noncredit classes can be found in the spring 2014 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $109 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, located on campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired 974-9556); or online at morainevalley.edu.
Moraine Valley Tinley Park campus spring courses
  Looking for a shorter commute for classes at Moraine Valley Community College?
  The college will offer 60 classes, beginning Jan. 21, at its Southwest Education Center (SWEC), 17900 S. 94th Ave. in Tinley Park.
  Some credit classes include Keyboarding I, Art Appreciation, Introduction to Business, Composition I and II, Introduction to Criminal Justice, American History I, Medical Terminology, College Algebra, Music Appreciation, Introduction to Psychology, General Sociology, and Spanish. There are also several noncredit classes offered at SWEC including Plus 50 Internet Basics, Medicare Workshop, Hiring Employees, Food for Life, “Reel” Classic Films, and Beginning Conversational Spanish.
  A complete listing of all the classes at SWEC and credit and noncredit classes offered at all Moraine Valley campuses can be found in the spring 2014 class schedule or online at morainevalley.edu. Registration is ongoing. Tuition is $109 per credit hour plus fees and books. Students who have applied to the college can register in the Registration Office, on the main campus in the Student Services Center (Building S), 9000 W. College Pkwy. in Palos Hills; by phone at 974-2110 (TTY for the hearing impaired 974-9556); or online at morainevalley.edu.

Oak Lawn
  Oak Lawn Community High School treated the students who had perfect attendance during the 2012-13 school year to breakfast and awarded prizes at a before-school gathering. Along with previous raffles, the students were provided a hot breakfast, gift certificates, and personal acknowledgements from the attendance/deans office.
  The following students had perfect attendance: Seniors: Erik Abrahamson, Richard Alcantar, Kristina Balboa, Stephanie Barragan, Michelle Block, Crystal Cabada, Cesar Cervantes, Damian Cervantes, Natalia Gawelda, Jacob Kupres, Kyle Lavelle, David Le, Kathleen Mancillas, Daniel McGrath, Casey O’Connell, Anthony Ortiz, Megan Pripusich, John Saldivar, Derek Schapiro, Justin Schutt, Omar Sifuentes, and Kamila Zaremba.
  Juniors: Gina Dymit, Cecilia Escobar, Diana Espitia, Alberto Fernandez-Vega, Samantha Germann, Mitchell Gonsch, Eliezel Gonzalez, Patrick Gudanowski, Matthew Hareza, Elizabeth Hunt, Nathan Jones, Christopher Kulik, Ashley Labuda, Rocky Martin, Shannon McGuire, Nicholas Minnella, Anna Oswald, Tomasz Parzadka, Johnny Pilny, Joshua Prince, Daniel Reyes, Ernesto Rivas, Richard Saldivar, Francisco Sanchez, Jacqueline Taylor, Matthew Tischer, and Janette Zamora.
  Sophomores: Lamees Abdallah, Jalisa Balboa, Arieni Cabanas, Kayla Cartolano, Nicholas Cavazos, Jacquelin Dominguez, Kara Egan, Marcus James Favila, John Figus, Cynthia Garcia, Aleksandra Gronski, Ariana Hernandez, Pawel Las, Fernando Lopez, Angelica Ortiz, Nathan Owen, Cole Psik, Sara Quiroga, Michael Rodriguez, Doris Serna, Richard Sheppler, Vaughn Smith, Viviana Vergara, and Michal Zasadni.

  The breakfast was organized by Dean of Students Jamie Hernandez and Interim Attendance Coordinator David Saunders.

Chicago Christian mixes it up

  Students recently walking into the cafeteria knew right away that this lunch would not be a typical Thursday lunch.
  For starters, Christmas music greeted them as they walked through the doors. They were then presented with a card by students dressed like reindeer, and encouraged to find their assigned table for the meal. It was a Mix-It-Up Lunch.
  Mix-It-Up Lunch was created by the Mosaic Diversity Club at CCHS.
  “We have hosted a variety of programs to improve diversity awareness for our students,” said Mosaic sponsor Cristin Lenters. “This experience helps students embrace the diversity within our school.”

  Students were given a card directing them to a corresponding table in the cafeteria. The random assignment guaranteed that any given table would be a mix of grades, gender, ethnicity and social groups.
  “It is pretty easy to stay in your social bubble for four years. Mix-It-Up Lunch helps students get to know new people,” said Mosaic President, Kyla Mitchell.
  To ensure that everyone had something to talk about, cups filled with holiday-themed questions were on every table. A volunteer leader at each table made sure everyone was introduced and had a chance to answer the questions. Many teachers also participated and were randomly assigned a table.

  “We focus on community as a school. This lunch helps people get connected and have a little fun before Christmas,” said Mitchell.


—Submitted by Chicago Christian High School

Dist. 123 students have great ideas at Invention Concention

  Do your shoes have an umbrella? Do you have a fan on your cell phone? D123 students did and showed their creative ideas off at the ninth annual eighth Grade Invention Convention on Dec. 12.
  Students showed their creativity through the originality and production of their prototypes. Each student’s personality was allowed to come out in their advertisement and sales pitch.
  Students started the project with identifying a problem that their invention would solve. They conducted a patent search and made changes to their designs if they found similar inventions already on the market or already holding a patent.
  These young entrepreneurs worked hard on their sales pitch in hopes of catching the attention of potential investors (other students). After a hands-on demonstration, anyone interested could view a presentation on the inventor’s netbook.
  Throughout the day, students enjoyed viewing demonstrations of some unusual, but innovative, products. These potential investors then voted on the best invention.

—Submitted by District 123