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Happy homecoming for red-hot Richards

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  Richards students celebrate a big play during the Bulldogs’ 45-0 victory over Oak Lawn Friday night. Since suffering a 35-34 home loss to Evergreen Park, the Bulldogs have outscored their last three opponents — Reavis, Argo and Oak Lawn — by a combined 112-0 score.

  For more photos and details of the Battle of Oak Lawn plus a look at other area action, see the sports section.

Submitted photo.

Two Palos Hills cops promoted

  • Written by Kelly White

By Kelly White
Correspondent

  Two Palos Hills Police Officers hard work paid off by promotions granted earlier this month by Mayor Jerry Bennett and Chief Paul Madigan.
  Sergeant Traci Hlado was appointed to the position of lieutenant and Patrolman Michael Collins was appointed to sergeant of the Palos Hills Police Department.
  Former lieutenant Sam Nelson has submitted his letter of resignation, retiring from the Palos Hills Police Department. This created a vacancy created in the lieutenant’s position and once a new lieutenant was appointed, the department would then have a vacancy in the sergeant’s position. After some deliberation, Bennett and the Palos Hills Police Department narrowed down to whom they feel are the two most fit for the job.
  Hlado was administered the Oath of Office by Bennett and was appointed into the office of Lieutenant for the Palos Hills Police Department.
  “You have been around a long time with the city of Palos Hills and moved up in rank, especially through the Detective Division, which we are certainly going to miss you in that part of it,” Bennett told Hlado. “But, I know your leadership on the street is going to go a long way with our police officers.”
  Lieutenant Hlado thanked Bennett and the City of Palos Hills before Collins was called forward and administered the oath, appointing him to the office of Sergeant for the Palos Hills Police Department.

  “Mike has been with us a long time and I know he looked forward, as all patrolmen do, in taking tests and wanting to get the opportunity for leadership and moving up in the ranks,” Bennett said. “Over the last four or five years, we have had openings that have become available and we have referred them to our officers to have the opportunity to be promoted. Mike did very well on his exam and he was next on the list for a promotion with our police department.”

  Collins also thanked Bennett and the City of Palos Hills, admitting his hard work and determination with the Palos Hills Police Department has paid off through the good fortune of his promotion.

Zounds: Hearing aids ‘that can change lives’

  • Written by Tim Hadac

  A hearing aid company promising revolutionary new technology that can change people’s lives has opened shop in Palos Heights — its first unit in Illinois.

  “We are the new kid on the block, and we hope to be here for a long time,” said Karen Liddell, franchisee of Zounds, at 7202B W. 119th St., in the Tiffany Square shopping center, Route 83 and Harlem.
  Based in Phoenix, Ariz., Zounds designs, manufactures and sells hearing aids for people with mild to profound hearing impairments.
  The company was founded by electrical engineer Sam Thomasson, whose daughter, Kate, lost much of her hearing due to an illness when she was a toddler and later struggled — as many do — with the limitations of conventional hearing aids. Thomasson and his team of engineers searched for solutions, amassing more than 50 patents and fitting Kate with her first Zounds prototype at age 16.
  The “breakthrough” technology, according to Thomasson, changed his daughter’s life. Today, according to a company brochure, she is a college student studying electrical engineering.
  That life-changing technology is a key to the success of Zounds, Liddell noted.
  “I fell in love with the ‘Sam and Kate’ story,” she said. “It’s a story of father’s love for his daughter. How great is that? I want to be in a position to make that kind of a difference in people’s lives, and I believe I am.”
  Liddell, an accountant, said she became a Zounds franchisee because she “was facing a layoff in my industry, and I’m too young to retire.”
  She decided to go into business for herself and started shopping for a franchise opportunity with several companies, “but I wanted to go into business with people you can trust and make a connection with. That’s why I chose Zounds.”
  She said that Zounds offers several clear advantages over others.
  “First, we are the leader in technology,” she added. “Second, we are buying hearing aids directly from the manufacturer, so we’re the price leader — offering hearing aids at $999 each when others’ cost several times more. Third, we offer same-day fittings. So people come in here with hearing loss, and within two hours they’re going to leave hearing better, and that can change their lives. That’s what sets us apart from our competitors.”
  Zounds also offers free hearing exams, remote-control programming, and rechargeable batteries and charging station.
  A native of Chicago’s South Side and current resident of Homewood, Liddell is quick to credit and praise her staff — Jeff Clark, a state-licensed hearing instrument specialist, and Rachel Nelson, customer service representative. “I am blessed to have a real A-Team here, and I am certain our clients will agree.”
  Clark, with nearly a decade’s experience in the field, said he has found a real home at Zounds.
  “Most places are about selling hearing aids,” he said. “I wanted to work at a place where we’re about caring for people. [At Zounds] I don’t have to worry about selling a hearing aid, because our prices are lower than everyone else’s. I can focus on what’s important, which is making it work for that customer. We take that very seriously here.”

EP woman arrested for concealing her role in 1969 terrorist bombing

  • Written by Bob Rakow

  A 66-year-old Evergreen Park woman who was convicted 43 years ago in Israel for participating in a terrorist bombing was arrested Tuesday morning by federal agents.
  Rasmieh Yousef Odeh was arrested shortly after the unsealing of an indictment filed in federal court in Detroit and made an appearance in the afternoon before U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Mason.
  She was released on $15,000 bond after giving up her passports.
  Odeh was charged with immigration fraud for concealing her arrest, conviction and imprisonment, which were material facts for the United States government in determining whether to grant her citizenship, the indictment said.
  The indictment alleges that Odeh was convicted for her role in the 1969 bombings of a supermarket and the British Consulate in Jerusalem, which were carried out on behalf of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a designated terrorist organization.
  Founded in the wake of the Six Day War of 1967, the organization is described as a Marxist-Leninist revolutionary group that was instrumental in the formation of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
  Odeh and others placed multiple bombs at the British Consulate and in a supermarket, according to the indictment. One of the bombs at the supermarket detonated, killing two Israelis and injuring 20 others. The other bomb did not detonate. The bomb at the Consulate four days later caused structural damage to the facility.
  Odeh was arrested several days after the bombings and sentenced by Israeli military authorities to life imprisonment but was released after 10 years as part of a prisoner exchange, and she then returned to the West Bank.
  The indictment alleges that Odeh, who was a Jordanian citizen, immigrated to the United States in 1995 and became a naturalized citizen in 2004.
  “The United States will never be a safe haven for individuals seeking to distance themselves from their pasts,” said William Hayes, acting special agent in charge for Homeland Security Investigations Detroit in a news release. “When individuals lie on immigration documents, the system is severely undermined and the security of our nation is put at risk.”
  “An individual convicted of a terrorist bombing would not be admitted to the United States if that information was known at the time of arrival,” United States Attorney Barbara McQuade said. “Upon discovery that someone convicted of a terrorist attack is in the United States illegally, we will seek to use our criminal justice system to remove that individual.”
  If convicted of the charge, Odeh will be stripped of her United States citizenship. She also faces a maximum sentence of 10 years for naturalization fraud.
  This case was investigated by special agents of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations with the assistance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
  Odeh was mentioned in an article, “Women’s Struggle in Occupied Palestine,” which was published on the website New Jersey Solidarity: Activists for the Liberation of Palestine.”
  The article said Odeh and other women “were arrested, accused of planning and executing two of the greatest military operations at that time: the explosion at the Supersol supermarket and the attempted explosion at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.”

A healthy dose of arguing at Oak Lawn meeting

  • Written by Bob Rakow

 

Whacking board members’ health insurance and

many hot issues dominate Tuesday’s gathering

 

  Several political hot-button issues dominated Tuesday’s Oak Lawn Village Board meeting as trustees bickered over transparency, the future of the senior center and political fundraising techniques.

  A majority of trustees, however, expressed support for a proposal to eliminate health insurance for board members.
  The proposal was put forth by Trustee Tim Desmond, who called for “shared sacrifice” at a time when the board is considering several significant cuts to balance the village budget.
  Desmond, who joined the village health plan in April, asked that the proposal be placed on the Nov. 12 agenda.
  Several trustees and Mayor Sandra Bury currently take full or partial health benefits.
  Trustee Alex Olejniczak said he does not plan to participate in the village health insurance plan in the next fiscal year. Bury said she does not take her salary as liquor commissioner, which is comparable to the cost of her insurance and praised Desmond for his leadership in making the proposal.

  “I think he sees the hypocrisy, as I did,” Bury said.
  While Desmond’s proposal was met with approval, discussion on other topics was not as harmonious.
  For example, Olejniczak took issue with Streit’s contention that he participated in a secret meeting with Bury, Village Manager Larry Deetjen, Park Board Director Maddie Kelly and Park Board President Sue Murphy to discuss a plan to transition senior services to the district.
  He said Streit misled people by saying that the meeting was attended by a majority of village board members.

  Trustee Carol Quinlan, meanwhile, repeated her request for a meeting between the board and seniors to garner feedback regarding plans to outsource senior services and renovate the Memorial Park bathhouse into a senior center.
  Quinlan, who previously called for such a meeting, did not receive a response to her proposal.
  “I’d love to know what’s going on,” Quinlan said.

  Olejniczak also chastised Streit for pressuring residents and businesses to attend his recent fundraiser by calling them numerous times in the days leading up to the event.
  “You would think that if somebody said, ‘No, I’m not attending or no, I’m not going to be there,’ that would be enough,” he said.

  Three people who placed the fundraising calls attended the meeting and said they were offended by remarks made at the Oct. 8 board meeting alleging that pressure tactics were used to convince people to attend the fundraiser.
  “It never occurred,” Streit said. “People have a right to make campaign donations. My campaign fund is in complete compliance with all laws.”
  Streit, meanwhile, proposed an ordinance requiring website transparency, which would require a plethora of information such as videos of meetings, public records, budgets, audits, contracts and salary and benefits be available on the village’s website.
  The information is similar to items on the Illinois Policy Institute’s transparency checklist, which Bury is following in the development of a new website.