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‘I know who my daughter is’

  • Written by Bob Rakow

Grieving Worth mother disputes Cook County prosecutor’s claim of pill purchase during night of her daughter’s death

 

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Photo by Jeff Vorva. A mourner brings a cross that was placed in a memorial for Brittany Wawrzyniak during a vigil on a cold Monday night in Worth.

 

  Rebecca Tully sat in the living room of her Worth home Monday morning struggling to understand why anyone would harm her daughter, Brittany Wawrzyniak.

“What happened was pointless,” Tully said. “I think there’s a lot we don’t know.”

Twenty four hours later, as she made last-minute preparations for her daughter’s wake, Tully fervently disputed the scenario that led to her daughter’s death, which was outlined by Cook County prosecutors.

Prosecutors said Wawrzyniak, 18, died Friday after she was ejected from the backseat of an alleged drug dealer’s car after buying pills from him.

Wawrzyniak met Eric Steven Johnson at the boat launch near 115th Street and Beloit Avenue. She got into the backseat of his car and handed him $200 in exchange for 30 pills of Clonazepam, prosecutors said.

Hoops removal demanded by OL residents

  • Written by Bob Rakow

 

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Photo by Bob Rakow. Oak Lawn resident Paul Egan asks the Oak Lawn Park Board why upgrades to Little Wolfe Park did not include removal of the basketball courts. Several residents attended the meeting to call for the hoops to come down following an August fight that led to two arrests.

 

  The basketball hoops at Oak Lawn’s Little Wolfe Park will stay up for now despite protests Monday night from a small group of residents who live near the park.

Park District commissioners decided to consider the matter further at a future committee meeting rather than vote on a proposal to remove the hoops from the park.

“We do understand your frustrations, but things take time, park board President Sue Murphy said at Monday’s meeting.

The six residents who spoke at the meeting, including village Trustee Carol Quinlan, strongly urged park commissioners to remove the hoops. Residents have called for the removal of the hoops following an Aug. 14 fight involving two groups of teens, which led to two arrests.

Quinlan attended the park board’s September meeting and said the fight was not an isolated incident. Instead, she said, the court was used throughout the summer by troublemakers from outside the village. The poor conduct led other patrons, such as parents with young children, to avoid the park, she said.

One test at a time

  • Written by Bob Rakow

Dist. 117 pleased with state test results but isn’t resting on its laurels

  Oak Ridge Elementary School in Palos Hills is jump-page-2-col-reichOak Ridge Principal Beth Reich was pleased with recent test results but is looking for bigger gains. Photo by Jeff Vorva.taking it one test at a time.

  Principal Beth Reich is pleased with her school’s results on the recently released Illinois Standards Achievement Test, but she’s focused on the progress her students will make this year.
  The Illinois Standards Achievement Test measures student achievement in reading and math in grades three through eight and science in grades four and seven.
  Nearly 79 percent of the 630 students at Oak Ridge met or exceeded the state’s expectations—a figure that was much in higher in previous years before that state raised expectations for the test.
  Students at Glen Oaks Elementary School in Hickory Hills also did well with 77.9 percent meeting or achieving state standards. At Conrady Middle School, 75 percent of student met or exceeded standards.
  The results are from tests given in March. Starting next year, students will be given a new standardized test which will determine whether they are meeting new expectations based on Common Core state standards.
  Many school districts throughout the southwest suburbs did not perform as well as in previous years, leaving some administrators disappointed.
  Reich, however, prefers to look forward and discuss the tools the school, 103rd Street and 88th Avenue, has at its disposal to help improve student performance.
  “We have programs in place for any child who needs them,” Reich said. “We feel that it’s important to the child.”
  Those programs include an after-school tutoring program that serves more than 100 students as well as four reading specialists on staff who work with small groups of children who require additional support, Reich said.
  But the school can’t intervene without knowing which students need help and that’s where data analysis comes into play.front-color-3-col-studentsThird graders in Christine Durco’s class raise their hands in joy as Oak Ridge Elementary School in Palos Hills scored well on a state achievement test.  Photo by Jeff Vorva.

 



  “We have a lot of data,” Reich said. “We believe that’s the foundation.”
  Reich, in her third year as principal at Glen Oaks, said students know what’s at stake and work with their teachers to set performance goals.
  “We have the kids in on this,” she said. “The kids are happy to achieve goals. It’s mostly their hard work.”
  Seventy-seven percent of the students in North Palos School District 117 met or exceeded state standards. That figure would have been in the 90th percentile under the previous testing standards, Reich said.
  However, the score is the highest of the seven elementary school districts in the The Reporter’s coverage area.
  District 117 Supt. Jeannie Stachowiak credited the significant amount of teamwork in the district for success on the test. She said the district’s three assistant superintendents are routinely in the schools “really listening to the teachers need.”
  “I think we’re going to see a lot of growth this year,” she said.
    “It’s just a new reality,” Reich said of the new state standards. “We’re always looking to be better.”

Blighted Plaza property ready for demolition

  • Written by Bob Rakow

  Evergreen Park officials Monday took some additional steps toward the redevelopment of the Plaza.
  Trustees approved an ordinance approving the Evergreen Park Place redevelopment plan, which will permit the village to charge a 1 percent sales tax within the commercial district to reimburse the costs of demolition and renovation, Mayor Jim Sexton said.
  A second ordinance approved on Monday designates the Plaza property as blighted, which would allow the developer to pay 10 percent in Cook County property taxes rather than 25 percent, Sexton said.
  The ordinance also grants the village condemnation powers that can be used if any remaining tenants do not leave the mall, 95th Street and Western Avenue.
  Negotiations with Carson’s, the lone retailer in the mall, have stalled, Sexton said. Condemnation power gives the village leverage in future negotiations, he said.
  The retailer is only one remaining at the otherwise shuttered mall. The mall closed on May 31. Applebee’s, which is located on an out lot, and Planet Fitness, remain open.
  Plans calls for an outdoor mall that would a feature a variety of retailers and restaurants.
  The 61-year-old shopping mall, formerly the Evergreen Plaza, has been in foreclosure since 2011.
  DeBartolo Development wants to demolish the mall and replace it with a “lifestyle center,” Chicago Real Estate Daily.com reported. The development firm is owned by former San Francisco 49ers’ owner Eddie DeBartolo.
  Sexton and other village officials met with DeBartolo representatives last week. The developer hopes to begin demolition in the spring followed by construction, which would take about one year, Sexton said.

Jeff Vorva's Editor's Notebook: Marathon man and all-around good guy wins Runner of the Year Award

  • Written by Jeff Vorva

 

jeff column  It’s hard to catch up with former Hickory Hills resident Mike Kenny because he’s always on the go.
  But Kenny, who now calls Mokena his home, was named the south suburban-based Yankee Runners Club’s Runner of the Year in a ceremony in late October. One of the criteria for the award was his amazing 2013 schedule of attempting to run 12 marathons in less than an eight-month period.
  He celebrated his 50th birthday in April and already had a couple of races under his belt when he decided to try for a dozen before the year ran out.
  His 12th race is coming up this Sunday as he runs in the inaugural Edward Hospital Marathon in Naperville. His first event to start this streak was the 50K Paleozoic Run through the Palos Trail System on March 16. It was the first time that event hosted a 50K, which is 31.1 miles.
  His Toyota Camry has put on more front-color-1-col-with-jvcolFormer Hickory Hills resident Mike Kenny shows his 11 medals that he earned in 11 marathons that he competed in since March. He will go for No. 12 Sunday in Naperville. He is posing next to his Toyota Camry, a car that put on 1,500 extra miles because of his marathon adventures. Photo by Jeff Vorva.than 1,500 miles because of his trips to various Midwestern marathons and ultramarathons this year. He’s run in the Chicago Marathon 18 times.
  He has 40 career marathons under his belt heading into Naperville but the one he remembers most is the humid Chicago Marathon in 2007. It was there that he helped a friend who fell ill after the race. He rushed the friend to the hospital.
  The friend, who lives in Palos Heights, didn’t want to be identified citing he didn’t want to draw attention away from Kenny, said that Kenny’s actions were “huge.”
  “It was bad situations for me for sure,” the Palos Heights man said. “It was just awesome what he did. We met up in the 24th mile of the race and he stuck with me. After the race I was telling him to ‘go home’ but he ended up taking me to the hospital. I’ve known Mike for years. He’s a great guy and it’s his nature to do that kind of stuff. He’s awesome.”
  Yankee Runners President Joe Werner said that Kenny won the award for the way he lives his life as well as his running prowess.
  Kenny said he was glad he could be there for his friend.
  “I offered to drive him home,” Kenny said. “He didn’t want me to do that, but I told him I would tackle him, tie him up and throw him in the trunk, so he finally agreed to it.”
  Kenny lived in Hickory Hills for 15 years before moving to Mokena.
  He said he was happy to win the Runner of the Year award.
  “We have about 130 runners in the group from all over,” he said. “It was an honor to be selected.”

Bigger in Texas
  In case you were wondering, the record for the most marathons run in a 12-month period is 157, done by a 68-year-old guy from Texas named Larry Macon, according to the Guinness Book of World Records.
  Also, some dude from Japan ran 52 marathon in 52 days so it looks like Kenny isn’t the craziest guy around.

Techno Talk debuts
  We made a few more tweaks with the back end of the paper.
  The business page tended to put me to sleep on occasion so in order to put a little more sizzle on the page, we’ve added a weekly feature called “Techno Talk” which will focus on newfangled gadgets and cool stuff.
  It seems like whenever you buy a new phone, tablet, computer, iPod or whatever, it becomes obsolete in a few minutes.
  Hopefully “Techno Talk” will help take some of the confusion out of the process. This week, it looks at tablets available for the Christmas season.